Walt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesis

Mickey continued to grow and evolve throughout the 20th century, moving into comic strips , feature films, video games, theme parks and a ton of games and toys. He first appeared in color in 1935, in the cartoon called "The Band Concert". He got his now-standard gloves in the 1929 short The Opry House. Mickey's appearance changed steadily from his creation onwards. What is often considered the "classic version" of Mickey is the one that was designed by Floyd Gottfredson. The most popular version , however, is the Mickey created by Italian illustrator Romano Scarpa.

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Since 1928, Mickey was voiced by Walt Disney himself, a task in which Disney took great personal pride. However, by 1947, Disney was becoming too busy with running the studio to do regular voice work which meant he could not do Mickey's voice anymore (and as it is speculated, his cigarette habit had damaged his voice over the years) and during the recording of the Mickey and the Beanstalk section of Fun and Fancy Free , Mickey's voice was handed over to veteran Disney sound effects artist and voice actor James MacDonald . (Both Disney's and MacDonald's voices can be heard on the final soundtrack.) MacDonald voiced Mickey in the remainder of the theatrical shorts and for various television and publicity projects up until his retirement in the mid-1970's, although Walt would still reprise Mickey's voice on rare occasions, such as in the introductions to the original 1954—1959 run of The Mickey Mouse Club TV series and " The Fourth Anniversary Show " episode of the Disneyland TV series. Carl Stalling voiced Mickey in The Karnival Kid in 1929. Clarence Nash voiced Mickey in the 1934 short The Dognapper , which would also be the only time that Nash voiced him. Walt was traveling in Europe at the time and was unavailable to record his lines for Mickey. J. Donald Wilson, Joe Twerp, and John Hiestan provided the voice of Mickey in the 1938 broacasts of The Mickey Mouse Theater of the Air . [16] Stan Freberg voiced Mickey in the 1954 Disney record album Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse's Birthday Party . Alan Young voiced Mickey in An Adaptation of Dickens' Christmas Carol, Performed by The Walt Disney Players in 1974, which would be the first and only time that Alan Young voiced him. [17] [18]

Walt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesis

walt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesis

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walt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesiswalt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesiswalt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesiswalt disney and mickey mouse a cultural transformation thesis