Get compare contrast essay

An orange grown in Florida usually has a thick and tightly fitting skin, and is also heavy with juice. Californians say that if you want to eat a Florida orange you have to get into a bathtub first. California oranges are light in weight and have thick skins that break easily and come off in hunks. The flesh inside is marvelously sweet, and the segments almost separate themselves. In Florida, it is said that you can run over a California orange with a ten-ton truck and not even wet the pavement. The differences from which these hyperboles arise will prevail in the two states even if the type of orange is the same. In arid climates, like California's, oranges develop a thick albedo, which is the white part of the skin. Florida is one of the two or three most rained-upon states in the United States. California uses the Colorado River and similarly impressive sources to irrigate its oranges, but of course irrigation can only do so much. The annual difference in rainfall between the Florida and California orange-growing areas is one million one hundred and forty thousand gallons per acre. For years, California was the leading orange-growing state, but Florida surpassed California in 1942, and grows three times as many oranges now. California oranges, for their part , can safely be called three times as beautiful.

Fresh topics for essays

  1. Would you rather make a lot of money or fulfil your dreams?
  2. What is the difference between bulimia and anorexia?
  3. Smoking or drinking - which is worse?
  4. Weight lifting or CrossFit - what would you choose?
  5. Male friendship vs. female friendships.
  6. Starbucks vs. Keurig.
  7. Disneyland vs. Port Adventura.
  8. Warner Brothers vs. 20 th Century Fox.
  9. Paganism vs. Islam.
  10. Outside vs. inside beauty.
Original themes for compare and contrast essays
  1. Your happiest day vs. your saddest day.
  2. Star Wars vs. Star Trek.
  3. Rap music vs. rock.
  4. Writing email vs. sending a regular letter.
  5. Norway vs. Iceland.
  6. My two dearest friends.
  7. Nascar vs. Formula One.
  8. British Empire vs. Roman Empire.
  9. Working in an open space vs. working in a small office.
  10. Infatuation vs. love.
We have created quite a list for you, don't you think? You will definitely find something you can write about. Just remember to talk about something you have a certain level of expertise in or have reliable sources to check the information at. Other than that, grab our plan - and start writing the piece right away!

In the next section, you will be planning your own Compare & Contrast lesson. To prepare, you should do the following things before you move on:

  • Keep an eye out for students who use comparative thinking in your classroom. What steps do you notice them taking? How comfortable are they with comparison?
  • As you teach over the coming weeks, keep track of those times when you might have used Compare & Contrast. Take note of these instances, and be ready to share them as you proceed through the following sections.
  • Compile all the materials you'll need to plan a Compare & Contrast lesson (., content, standards to cover) and bring them to the next meeting with your learning club.

Teacher: I learned a lot about alligators and crocodiles from that passage. I noticed that the way the passage compared and contrasted alligators and crocodiles really helped me understand the ways that alligators and crocodiles are the same, and the ways that they are different. I also noticed that there were certain words and phrases that I saw as I was reading that let me know that this was a compare and contrast passage. Let's go back to the passage now and see if we can find any words or phrases that let us know that the passage is comparing and contrasting two types of animals. [Teacher and students read through the passage again, and create a list of compare-contrast words and phrases that includes both, similar, but, different, compare, and to tell apart.]

Rick VanDeWeghe writes of modeling: "teachers show how they go about the processes of reading and writing-drawing students' attention to the ways readers and writers think and the real decisions they make, especially when they themselves are challenged." In her book Conversations , Regie Routman explains why this modeling process is so successful: "It has always been our job to teach directly and explicitly in response to students' needs-carefully demonstrating, specifically showing how, clearly explaining. Whatever we want our students to do well, we first have to show them how. Of all the changes I have made in my teaching, adding explicit demonstration to everything I teach has been the single most important factor in increasing students' literacy" (24).

Get compare contrast essay

get compare contrast essay

Teacher: I learned a lot about alligators and crocodiles from that passage. I noticed that the way the passage compared and contrasted alligators and crocodiles really helped me understand the ways that alligators and crocodiles are the same, and the ways that they are different. I also noticed that there were certain words and phrases that I saw as I was reading that let me know that this was a compare and contrast passage. Let's go back to the passage now and see if we can find any words or phrases that let us know that the passage is comparing and contrasting two types of animals. [Teacher and students read through the passage again, and create a list of compare-contrast words and phrases that includes both, similar, but, different, compare, and to tell apart.]

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