Anne bradstreet essay topics

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This is a great list, largely because it is so idiosyncratically subjective. Lists should be like that; who, after all, can presume to make such a judgmental sweep in behalf of us all. For my money it tilts a little too heavily toward the twentieth-century an away from what I consider the classics, reflecting my age and fossilized academic training. I would have found room for the likes of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Wordsworth, etc., along with Virgil and Dante and and Goethe and Victor Hugo; and needless to say Melville and Hawthorne, and Whitman, and Emily Dickinson, and of course Mark Twain–all pretty standard dead white male (mostly) and canonized by tradition. But that’s okay, I still love reading that stuff. My idiosyncratic choices would have included the old Wakefield Master (an anonymous medieval British Playwright), Jonathan Swift, among the Brits; William Blake, Anne Bradstreet, Jonathan Edwards, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Dean Howells among the pre-twentieth century Americans. My quirky twentieth century picks would have included Thomas Wolfe, and most certainly Davis Grubb, whose masterpiece, “Night of the Hunter,” will hopefully some day get the recognition it deserves. Sean Beaudoin, with all due respect, you add nothing to a real conversation with your alacrity in simply snorting that Greg’s list “sucks.” Such a declaration precludes real thought. At least say something about what else your full list might include. There’s great fun in doing that–thought-provoking fun I might add.

Students will begin their travels in Africa and learn about historical fiction and cultural characters from Chinua Achebe. Then poetry from Africa has much to teach about sound in poetry. Hop on a plane for the Land of the Rising Sun to learn about point of view and cultural values from Kazuo Ishiguro. In addition to this Japanese novel, students will study poetry from Japan to learn about themes. Students next travel to the Middle East to read Naguib Mahfouz and learn about symbolism and worldviews. Middle Eastern poetry teaches about imagery. Finally, students get to select an autobiography to learn more about writing their own autobiography. They wrap up their tour with more poetry that teaches about tone.

Critic Eileen Margerum delves further into the matter of Bradstreet's thoughts on poetry and, specifically, poetry written by women. She writes that Bradstreet was proud to be a poet and did not consider it sinful or unrighteous to undertake such an endeavor. By the time The Tenth Muse was published and Bradstreet penned "The Author to Her Book," she was a mature poet. In this poem, she "deals with correcting the poems, not condemning their creator." She sees herself as more than a DuBartas acolyte or a woman beholden to her influential father (see "The Prologue" for more on this subject).

Anne bradstreet essay topics

anne bradstreet essay topics

Critic Eileen Margerum delves further into the matter of Bradstreet's thoughts on poetry and, specifically, poetry written by women. She writes that Bradstreet was proud to be a poet and did not consider it sinful or unrighteous to undertake such an endeavor. By the time The Tenth Muse was published and Bradstreet penned "The Author to Her Book," she was a mature poet. In this poem, she "deals with correcting the poems, not condemning their creator." She sees herself as more than a DuBartas acolyte or a woman beholden to her influential father (see "The Prologue" for more on this subject).

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