50 essays frederick douglass

One final note about this chapter is the change that came upon Mrs. Auld as a result of her involvement with slavery. Indeed, Douglass's belief that slavery was as bad for the slaveholder as it was for the slave is most marked here. Previously pious, sweet, kind, and tolerant, Mrs. Auld began to exercise her power as a slaveholder. Her better nature was completely conquered. She embraced her husband's command to cease instructing Douglass, and overcompensated for it by brutally and methodically trying to prohibit Douglass from any interaction with the written word. The mastery over another human being that was the hallmark of slavery proved too beguiling to overcome, and Mrs. Auld was scarcely less cruel than many of the other southerners mentioned in the autobiography.

50 essays frederick douglass

50 essays frederick douglass

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50 essays frederick douglass50 essays frederick douglass50 essays frederick douglass50 essays frederick douglass